WA-OIG
Bldg.500
TRACE
Bldg.206
WAAIF
SMS
GHF
CEG
GAP
MMF
DMH
SAXS
XSAF
TIMS
JdLC Directorate
SHRIMP
John de Laeter Centre is a collaborative research venture involving
FIELDS OF RESEARCH
Planetary Science
Environment Science
Geochronology
 
Forensic Science
Economic Geology
Marine
Science
Material Science
JdLC
The University of Adelaide
University of Melbourne
Macquarie University
The Australian National University
University of Tasmania
State University of Campinas - UNICAMP
University of New Brunswick
Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing
Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou
Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences
Zhejiang University
Czech Academy of Science
Universite Joseph Fourier
Geological Survey of Finland
University of Tulibingen
Eotvos Lorand University
Indian Institute of Technology
National Geophysical Research Institute
Utrecht University
University of Waikato
GNS Science
University of Bergen
University of Wroclaw
Russian Academy of Sciences
Karadeniz Technical University
Geological Survey of Tanzania
University College London
University of California, Los Angeles
University of Texas at San Antonio
Oregon State University
WE COLLABORATE WITH LEADING
INSTITUTIONS AND ORGANISATIONS

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PROFESSOR JOHN DE LAETER (1933 - 2010)
John de Laeter established the Physics Department at Curtin University in 1968, and developed a geochronology capability in WA in collaboration with the Geological Survey of Western Australia. Rising to the position of Deputy Vice-Chancellor of Research and Development, John spearheaded a tripartite proposal to commission a new SHRIMP ion microprobe at Curtin in 1994, and received funding in 1998 to establish a State Centre of Excellence Program in geochemistry and isotope science which was aptly named the John de Laeter Centre for Mass Spectrometry. He also collaborated with the WA Museum on studying the state meteorite collection, and co-authored the book “Meteorites: A journey through space and time”. John de Laeter’s legacy includes a substantive body of published works, a celestial body that carries his name (Minor Planet de Laeter 3893), and a devoted group of students and colleagues that carry on his tradition of collaborative research that shapes our collective understanding of the Earth and its place in the Universe.